Joint Replacements

Hip Replacements

Hip replacement surgery is an option for those who have failed conservative treatment and are having ongoing hip and groin pain.  Conservative options include exercise, weight loss, physical therapy, medication and injections.  This operation resurfaces the damaged articular surface of the hip joint with metal and plastic implants improving pain and function.  For further education and illustrations click on the link above.

Knee Replacements  

If you suffer from arthritis in one or both of your knees, you have many options to control arthritic associated pain and stiffness.  Treatments include exercise, weight control, physical therapy, medication, injections, bracing and arthroscopy.  When these conservative therapies fail you may become a candidate for total knee replacement.  Partial or total knee replacement can relieve pain associated with arthritis as well as increase mobility improving overall quality of life.  This operation resurfaces the damaged articular surface of the knee joint with metal and plastic implants.  For further education and illustrations click  on the link above.

Partial Knee Replacements

Partial knee replacement or unicompartmental knee replacement is an advancement in replacement technique.  Those individuals with focal arthritis limited to one area of the knee may be a candidate for this procedure provided they have exhausted conservative treatments.  As the name implies it replaces only part of the knee.  There are three areas that can be resurfaced with metal and plastic implants.  They are the patellafemoral joint (knee cap), medial compartment and lateral compartment.  The medial compartment is most common.  This procedure allows for a smaller incision, less blood loss, shorter hospital stay and quicker return to more normal activities.

Shoulder Replacements

Shoulder replacement surgery is a less common surgical intervention than hip and knee, but is also tremendously successful and scores high satisfaction rates.  Like hip and knee replacement, it is an option for those who have failed conservative treatment and have an ongoing pain pattern that affects activities of daily living.  The operation resurfaces both the ball (humeral head) and socket (gleniod) with metal and plastic implants.  For further education and illustrations click on the link above.

 

Medical Reminder to Patients with Artificial Joint Replacements

Bacteria are everywhere in our environment and in our bodies. There is evidence that total joint implants can become infected by bacteria at any time if these bacteria enter the bloodstream. This can happen even years after surgery.

Although the efficacy of antibiotic prophylaxis following surgery has not been proven scientifically, we feel empirically that in an effort to protect your joint replacement, it is important to observe some general precautions. If any surgery is contemplated on an infected area in your body, or if the areas are ones in which the surgery or procedure is likely to cause bacteria to get into the bloodstream, antibiotics should be taken. These should be prescribed by your doctor, but he has to be aware of the fact that you have a joint replacement. Be sure to notify your doctor prior to any treatment.

Some common procedures we feel should be considered a possible source of infections are:

  1. Any dental work, including routine cleaning
  2. Cytoscopy or other mechanical manipulation of the genitourinary tract
  3. Sigmoidoscopy, proctoscopy, colonoscopy or other gastrointestinal procedures

Suggested prophylaxis for dental and upper gastrointestinal procedures is (Amoxicillin, Anspor, Velosef); 1 hour prior to the procedure, 2 grams orally and then 1 gram orally one hour later.

For patients with a penicillin allergy, we suggest Erythromycin 500 mg. – 1 gram 1 hour before the procedure, then 500 mg. 1 hour after.

For major abdominal, colorectal, or genitourinary surgery, consult your physician.